Amyris

Amyris

Latin name Amyris balsamifera – Family species Rutaceae

Amyris, also known as Schimmella oleifera, West Indian Sandalwood, and West Indian Rosewood, should not be confused with either "Sandalwood" Santalum album — for which it is reportedly sometimes used as a less expensive substitute — or "Rosewood" Aniba rosaeodora. Amyris is primarily used in perfumes, soaps, and cosmetics.

Oil Selection Guide

Color: Pale yellow
Viscosity: Somewhat viscous
Scent: Slightly woody, musty
Perfume Aroma: Base / middle note

Oil Source Information

Plant Type: Tree
Parts Used: Wood / Branches
Countries of Origin: Haiti, Jamaica
Extraction Method: Steam distillation

Known Chemical Constituents

Caryphyllene, cadinol, cadinene

Uses of Amyris

Primarily used in perfumery and as a fixative.

Amyris blends well with

 

Precautions / Contraindications

See Safety and Usage.

References and Resources

See References and Resources page.

Other Links of Interest

Studies Involving Amyris Oil



Print article to PDFDownload PDF